TheSecretCostumier - Embroidery book review
Ready & waiting

Sew hot, sew lazy…

    I did it again. After having so much fun during Me-Made-May, connecting with lovely bloggers and setting myself goals for the 10 days without any disruption, I kind of burned out. I wish I could say I’ve been in a beautiful sandy beach with no internet connection and no need to even think about making clothes, but I wasn’t. Sure I’ve been busy with work and seeing people, but I’ve also done my fair bit of lying in bed pinning for hours. One of my resolutions this year was to post content more consistently AND not to worry too much if I fail. So I’m trying to just take my time, chill out and try to figure out why I’m blogging in the first place and how to move forward.

    Until I get there, let me show you this little book I picked on a marvellous Saturday afternoon, from the bookstalls under Waterloo Bridge for a fiver. This is the kind of book  that you don’t even know you need, but you realize that you have to have it the moment you hold it in your hands.

   It’s called Design for Embroidery – The Fine Art Approach, and it is what it says on the tin, and then some. I have a soft spot for embroidery since my Grandma was a real talent when it came to the pretty famous Buzsaki embroidery, and I’m a sucker for the contemporary versions too, but the techniques displayed are not the main reason I like this book. I’m a lot more drawn to the design development demonstrated through the projects. (Click on the images to make them larger.)

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TheSecretCostumier - embroidery

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The book is divided into 3 sections:

  • Concepts (1.Shape, 2.Line, 3. Colour, 4.Texture, 5.Pattern, 6. Form),
  • Application (7.Large Scale Works from paintings 8. Large Scale Works from photographs),
  • Threads, Equipment and Techniques (9. Threads, 10. Equipment, 11.How to enlarge a design, 12. Finishing).

I think this approach could be applied to using any kind of inspiration and turning it into all kinds of different techniques and garments. There is a broad range of examples of inspiration, techniques and projects which makes me look at places for ideas where I wouldn’t have thought to look before.

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This wedding veil tutorial below, takes you from sketching the design, and cutting out the patterns to sewing it on the veil. I probably bought the book because even though it was written 16 years ago, I think this veil, and the most of the projects, still look pretty modern.

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Surely this guy’s hairstyle gives the era away, but I couldn’t resist showing you this patchwork waistcoat. I would probably make something more practical with this technique, but it’s a great idea and it’s really neatly done as well.

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TheSecretCostumier - embroidery9

    Is it just me and the unusually hot London summer, or do all of you tend to abandon ‘da machine’ for a chance to sit in a rooftop bar for hours to catch the last rays of the sun? Do you have any sewing related activities when the heat related procrastination kicks in and you just can’t be asked to make a mess?  (You guys are more than welcome to not help me justify my laziness, but it would really make those hours spent on Pinterest pretending to be creative much sweeter… ) 😉

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From scratch, Ready & waiting

What a bag-blog I found!

When was the last time you stumbled upon a real gem in the blogsphere. Something that made you excited, inspired and left you full of ideas? This is what happened to me today, when I found this little blog called “Bag’n-telle“.

That incredibly chic looking bag is 100% handmade, and you can make one too! The blog has several classic designs with detailed instruction, from advice on the fabric to choose to patterns and design tips.

I have always admired professionals in fashion design or any kind of crafts really, who are confident and generous enough to share their knowledge. I have never had any formal fashion education as I was too old to start trying to get into a fashion school and already had a degree, so sites like this make me feel enabled to gain access to some kind of an education after all. I mean all that pinning is fun, but sometimes its good to have all the background data on hand when you start a project that turns out this perfect.

There is no guarantee I will ever make any of these awesome bags as I know myself, but this might be a good reason to change my £9.00 Primark bag (that I have used for about 2 years now, almost every single day – I’ll post a photo so that you believe how crazy good it is) for something new. You probably guessed that I am not that obsessed with accessories, but I am working on this to change! 😉

Here are a few examples of the bags on the site. Just by picking out the fabric of my choice I could have endless possibilities to make the bag totally mine. Loving it!

Image sources: Bag’n- telle
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